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 Competition in Public Procurement

 

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Procurement Guidelines Around the World

To learn more about govern​ment procurement activities, please select a country by clicking on a flag

 

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​Fair trade and open competition in government procurement around the world is good business and good public policy. Competitive pricing, product innovation and performance improvements result from competitive practices and help ensure that government authorities get the best value for the public they serve. Furthermore, transparent and unbiased procurement practices are essential components for open government and a healthy economy.

Government procurement regulations in many countries including the U.S., member states in the European Union, Japan and countries in Latin America, prohibit government agencies from issuing vendor specific procurement solicitations, that call out specific brand or product names.

When government agencies issue vendor solicitations that prevent competition, they are unable to compare product costs and performance. At best, government agencies risk making purchases without knowing that they are buying the best product for their needs at the best price. At worst, they risk using taxpayer dollars to buy inferior products at inflated prices.

AMD works with governments around the world to promote competition, choice and to save taxpayers money. For example, the Office of Government Commerce in the United Kingdom saved as much as 40% on desktops and laptops by using competitive specifications and procurement practices encourage competition between different processor producers and using an innovative “e-auction” process to promote vendor competition.1 In Den​mark, the Danish Ministry of Finance saved as much as 40% on desktops and laptops by using competitive specifications and procurement practices encourage competition between different processor producers and using an innovative “e-auction” process to promote vendor competition.2 In the United States, the U.S. Air Force began competitive evaluations and bidding in 2007 and has now become one of the largest consumers of AMD processors for desktop computers in the world. An academic study commissioned by AMD estimates that the USAF could save as much as $500 million through competitive contracting for computers that use processors by AMD and other companies.3 Fair and open competition is not just good public policy, it is also good business. 

Footnotes