The past year has been a whirlwind at AMD; the critically-acclaimed Ryzen™ processor launched in March of 2017 bringing excitement and innovation back to the high-performance PC market for our technology partners, customers and end-users. The AM4 platform was introduced, creating the foundation for future-ready system builds. New generations of processors can be used with previously-released AM4 motherboards after a simple firmware (BIOS) update, a capability first seen with the recent introduction of the new Ryzen™ Desktop Processors with Radeon™ Vega Graphics. Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processors also debuted in the Summer of 2017, shaking the foundations of the high-end PC world.

The future always brings improvements and advancements in performance and optimizations. Just over a year after Ryzen processors were initially introduced to the world, it’s time for AMD to deliver another huge leap forward: Introducing 2nd Gen Ryzen™ Desktop Processors.

The Next Step Forward

The new 2nd Generation Ryzen processors deliver higher performance than ever before, with the Ryzen™ 7 2700X putting the highest multi-processing performance in mainstream desktop PC right into your customer’s hands.1,2 These fantastic new improvements are the result of the world’s first 12nm desktop processor, which includes a host of optimizations and improvements built upon the first generation Ryzen™ CPUs, designed to lower latency and improve performance with a new multicore boost algorithm to make advantage of max boost clocks up to 4.35GHz.

Gaming, streaming, and creating require processing power like never before, driving the need for more cores, more threads, and higher clocks. That’s exactly why the AMD 2nd Generation Ryzen™ processors are needed right now to deliver the highest multi-processing in their respective classes, so creators and gamers have the resources to execute the tasks they need completed quickly and efficiently.3

With lower latency and higher performance, this is a processor your customers can rely on; and the improvements don’t end there.

Smarter Than Ever

Intelligent 2nd Gen Ryzen desktop processors just got even smarter. Precision Boost 2 is an advanced multicore boost algorithm that adapts to the workload in flight, capable of adjusting processor frequencies of all cores in granular 25MHz increments to ensure optimal levels of performance. Extended Frequency Range 2 (XFR 2) builds on this, taking advantage of superior components like liquid cooling to enable even better results, leveraging thermal headroom to keep processor cores boosting for longer.4

Smart Prefetch cache is improved as well, with enhancements that lower memory latencies so these 2nd Gen Ryzen processors can deliver the data you need for fast and responsive computing.

Forward Thinking and Backwards Compatible

The Ryzen brand has always been about giving customers freedom to build a foundation and develop their system over time. AMD realizes this goal with the advanced AM4 platform, which offers compatibility with both the original Ryzen processor, and now the new 2nd Generation Ryzen processor. Since the 2nd Generation Ryzen processor is fully compatible with the AM4 platform and 300 series motherboards (with a simple BIOS update), your customers won’t need to build a whole new system to enjoy the improvements it brings to the table.

The AMD 400-series chipset-based motherboards available from AMD partners are optimized take full advantage of 2nd Generation Ryzen processors. Featuring optimized memory layout for high speed memory support, and optimized VRM and power phases for overclocking, the 400 series motherboards give 2nd Generation AMD Ryzen desktop processors potential to really shine.

All 400-series chipsets include support for StoreMI, an intelligent new storage software tiering solution to make the most of high speed SSDs combined with high capacity rotational storage, and up to 2GB of RAM cache. First available for use with AMD Ryzen processors & 300-series motherboards for a small fee from Enmotus5, this technology is now bundled with 400-series AMD motherboards. The AMD 400-series drives the user experience forward for the best desktop experience yet, whether it’s being used for gaming, content creation, or productivity.

Put the Intelligent Processor in Your Customer’s Hands

The first Ryzen processor remains a potent and powerful option for PC enthusiasts. There are customers who need the revolutionary multithreaded performance that Ryzen processors introduced to the market, on the advanced AM4 platform that has matured since it launched.

The new line of 2nd Generation AMD Ryzen desktop processors, the latest product offering from AMD, fits into the market alongside the first generation to give users even more choice when it comes to their budget and system needs. It’s for the early adopters, the imaginative creators, and the performance enthusiasts who demand nothing less. 2nd Generation Ryzen desktop processors are the next great leap forward in performance and smart design, and your customers are already talking about it.
Be the one to discuss it with them.

Footnotes

1. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 3/02/2018 on the following system. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used. AMD 2nd Gen Ryzen System Config: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X, ‘Turpan’ reference motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR3-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Graphics Card, Graphics driver 390.77, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 RS3 operating system. AMD Ryzen System Config: AMD Ryzen 7 1700X, 1700, Ryzen 5 1600X, Ryzen 5 1600 X370 Xpower Gaming Titanium motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR3-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Graphics Card, Graphics driver 390.77, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 RS3 operating system. Multiprocessing performance represented by Cinebench R15 nT multiprocessing performance. Each processor achieved the following scores: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X, 1837; AMD Ryzen 7 2700, 1577; AMD Ryzen 5 2600X, 1373; AMD Ryzen 5 2600, 1311; AMD Ryzen 7 1800X, 1628; AMD Ryzen 7 1700, 1411; AMD Ryzen 5 1600X, 1250; AMD Ryzen 5 1600, 1153. The Ryzen 7 2700X achieved a score of 1837 (1837/1628= up to 13% faster than the Ryzen 7 1800X). The Ryzen 7 2700 achieved a score of 1577 (1577/1411=up to 12% faster than the Ryzen 7 1700). The Ryzen 5 2600X achieved a score of 1373 (1373/1250= up to 10% faster than the Ryzen 5 1600X). The Ryzen 5 2600 achieved a score of 1311 (1311/1153= up to 14% faster than the Ryzen 5 1600). RZ2-3 

2. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 3/02/2018 on the following system. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used. AMD System Config: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X, ‘Turpan’ reference motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR3-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Graphics Card, Graphics driver 390.77, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 RS3 operating system. Intel System Config: Intel Core i7-8700K, Gigabyte Z370 AORUS Gaming5 motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR3-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Graphics Card, Graphics driver 390.77, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 RS3 operating system. Multiprocessing performance represented by Cinebench R15 nT multiprocessing performance. Mainstream desktop platform means Socket AM4 for AMD platforms and LGA 1151 for Intel platforms. he Ryzen 7 2700X (AMD’s highest performing mainstream desktop processor) achieved a score of 1837 (1837/1397=up to 36% faster than the Core i7-8700K), while the Core i7-8700K (Intel’s highest performing mainstream desktop processor) achieved a score of 1397 (1397/1837= up to 76% as fast, or up to 24% slower than the Ryzen 7 2700X). RZ2-1 

3. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 3/02/2018 on the following system. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used. AMD System Config: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X, ‘Turpan’ reference motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR3-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Graphics Card, Graphics driver 390.77, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 RS3 operating system. Intel System Config: Intel Core i7-8700K, Gigabyte Z370 AORUS Gaming5 motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR3-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Graphics Card, Graphics driver 390.77, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 RS3 operating system. Multiprocessing performance represented by Cinebench R15 nT multiprocessing performance. Processor class is defined here by competing price points between MSRP $380 and $220 USD. Suggested pricing found at ark.intel.com and amd.com. The Ryzen 7 2700X achieved a score of 1837 (1837/1397= up to 36% faster than the Core i7-8700K), while the Core i7-8700K (MSRP $370) achieved a score of 1397 (1397/1837= up to 76% as fast, or up to 24% slower than the Ryzen 7 2700X). The Ryzen 7 2700 (MSRP $299) achieved a score of 1577 (1577/1397=up to 13% faster than the Core i7- 8700K), while the Core i7-8700K (MSRP $370) achieved a score of 1397 (1397/1577= up to 89% as fast, or up to 11% slower than the Ryzen 7 2700). The Ryzen 5 2600X (MSRP $249) achieved a score of 1373 (1373/1020= up to 35% faster than the Core i5-8600K), while the Core i5-8600K (MSRP $258) achieved a score of 1020 (1020/1373= up to 74% as fast, or up to 26% slower than the Ryzen 5 2600X). The Ryzen 5 2600 (MSRP $249) achieved a score of 1311 (1311/1020= up to 29% faster than the Core i5-8600K), while the Core i5-8600K (MSRP $258) achieved a score of 1020 (1020/1311= up to 78% as fast, or up to 22% slower than the Ryzen 5 2600). RZ2-2 

4. AMD defines premium processor cooling as a combination of ambient temperature and thermal solution that results in processor temperatures below 60 degrees Celsius while the CPU is processing the system workload. GD-118

5. Please see www.enmotus.com/amd for more details.